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SyncSwitch

SyncSwitches carry synchronous protocols and data over TCP/IP networks. They convert synchronous protocols to TCP/IP and back again, allowing organizations to use their TCP/IP infrastructure to eliminate the cost of operating leased line data networks.

SyncSwitches operate at the bottom three layers of the OSI networking model. Whenever possible, SyncSwitch operates at layer 3 to greatly reduce overhead and increase throughput over the TCP/IP network.

A SyncSwitch communicates with the outside world with one or more synchronous serial ports, appropriate protocol and control software, and a 10/100BaseT Ethernet/ Fast Ethernet port.

Using SyncSwitches to replace the modems at each end of a leased line, an organization can eliminate the cash outflows and support costs associated with operating and managing leased lines in favour of small overheads on the bandwidth of the institutional intranet. SyncSwitch reduces the need to maintain legacy networks based on X.25, Frame Relay, SDLC, HDLC (NRM and ARM) and other structured or unstructured synchronous protocols.

Migrating a Legacy synchronous Network to a TCP/IP Infrastructure

Diagram depicts synchronous DTE devices connected with leased line

The diagram above depicts a simple leased line/ synchronous serial connection scenario. On the left side, a host or mainframe computer connects to a synchronous serial terminal device using a leased line and a pair of modems (or datasets). In this legacy network situation, each serial synchronous connection runs over a leased line. Modems or datasets adapt the computer's synchronous serial signals to the leased line signalling method (analog for modems, and digital for datasets).

SyncSwitch Protocol Flexibility

Although the diagram illustrates a point-to-point connection, SyncSwitches can handle both point-to-multipoint and mesh connections, depending on the protocols involved. The SyncServer 1000, can also be configured to carry unstructured serial bit streams across a TCP/IP network as well as the frame-oriented data communications protocols handled by multiport SyncServers. Protocols carried over SyncSwitch-provided links vary from vendor-specific implementations such as SNA/SDLC to those defined by industry consortia such as the Frame Relay Forum or the CCITT.

SyncSwitch permits easy migration of legacy networks to IP networks without application redesign, new terminal devices, modifications to host computer communications and host computer applications.

Cost reduction with SyncSwitch

It makes good business sense to reduce costs by migrating to IP when you can do it without application and operational redesign or disruption. Operational disruptions are minimized using SyncSwitch; simple configuration, minimal connection, and easy management combine to make modem and leased line removal and replacement with SyncSwitch a quick, painless operation.

SyncSwitch deployment in place of modems and a leased lines

The diagram below depicts our example above, converted using SyncSwitch to run over a TCP/IP network. At each location, the modem is replaced by a SyncSwitch, and the SyncSwitch connected via Ethernet to the local TCP/IP network. This scenario eliminates both the leased line and the modems.

Diagram depicts synchronous DTE devices connected with SyncSwitches

How is a SyncSwitch managed ?

SyncSwitch is easy to set up in any TCP/IP network environment. Any browser-equipped computer can be used as the management station for a SyncSwitch-based data network.

SyncSwitch is available in the following formats:

SyncSwitch 1000

  • One synchronous port
  • No moving parts (diskless, fanless) device
  • Tunnels any framed synchronous communications over the TCP/IP network (SNA/SDLC, HDLC, LAPB NRM X.25, BX.25/AMATPS)
  • Supports any unstructured or character synchronous bit stream
  • For X.25 / BX.25 tunnelling/switching, up to 32 virtual circuits
  • Link speeds up to 64Kbps
  • Browser-based interface for configuration and management
  • Compact design, low power consumption
  • Electrical interfaces available: RS-232, X.21, V.35, RS-422, RS-449, RS-530

SyncSwitch 1500

  • Two synchronous ports
  • No moving parts (diskless, fanless) device
  • Tunnels any framed synchronous communications over the TCP/IP network (SNA/SDLC, HDLC, LAPB NRM X.25, BX.25/AMATPS)
  • Tunnels any unstructured or character synchronous bit stream
  • For X.25 / BX.25 tunnelling/switching, up to 32 virtual circuits
  • Link speeds up to 64Kbps
  • Browser-based interface for configuration and management
  • Compact design, low power consumption
  • Electrical interfaces available: RS-232, X.21, V.35, RS-422, RS-449, RS-530

SyncSwitch 2000

  • Two synchronous ports
  • Tunnels any framed synchronous communications over the TCP/IP network (SNA/SDLC, HDLC, LAPB NRM X.25, BX.25/AMATPS)
  • Link speeds up to 2.048 Mbps
  • Suitable for customers requiring links to two synchronous devices, or more virtual circuits than SyncSwitch 1000
  • Browser-based interface for configuration and management
  • Rack-mountable, 4U enclosure, available with redundant power supply
  • Electrical interfaces available: RS-232, X.21, V.35, RS-422, RS-449, RS-530

SyncSwitch 8000

  • Eight synchronous ports
  • Tunnels any framed synchronous communications over the TCP/IP network (SNA/SDLC, HDLC, LAPB NRM X.25, BX.25/AMATPS)
  • Supports raw HDLC to synchronous or X.25 operation at speeds up to 2.048 Mbps
  • Browser-based interface for configuration and management
  • Rack-mountable, 4U enclosure, available with redundant power supply
  • Electrical interfaces available: RS-232, X.21, V.35, RS-422, RS-449, RS-530